El Haouma, that is, the neighborhood

09/06/2015 admin 0
What happened to these young men that were so celebrated in 2011, the main actors of the so-called 'arab springs'? In recent years we only hear news about politicians, leaders, terrorists... but what about normal people, where have they been? The answer is simple: in their neighborhoods. In Hay Hlil, in Oukacha, in Hezbet el Haggana, where there is the same anger and frustration that there was before the protests.
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Baraka men sakate: no more silence

17/12/2011 admin 0
"These people suffering in silence and dragging on through the streets, are fed up of hanging around! / And what does HE do? he gathers his men to rearrange the constitution! There's enough for getting mad at it. / Do they want us to rise up and rip off our rights with weapons? It's me who has to decide who do I want to sacralize / And if you want to understand it, come and live with us: god, nation, LIBERTY!". Even just this last sentence could have meant detention for Mouade Boulghade (age 24), moroccan rapper from Al-Wifaq neighborhood in Casablanca, known as "Lhaqed" (L7a9ed), the Angry One, in prison since last september. He changed the last line of the national anthem, singing "liberty" instead of "the king": a symbolic attack more dangerous for the Makhzen (the absolute power that had been ruling Morocco during the last four centuries) than all the demonstrations and protests of the 20th february movement.
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Foreigner Rome (the uses of diversity)

23/04/2011 admin 0
[/caption] Zoning means that some parts of the city, for real estate or urbanistic reasons, are devoted to certain groups of population: if there are neighborhoods where immigrants live, it's obvious that the schools of these neighborhoods have to cope with much more children born from foreigners. Such is the situation in Torpignattara, in the east periphery of Rome: a primary school is undergoing a series of public debates abounding in words like "ghetto", "emergency", "alarm", "banlieue". While right and left-wing politicians declare themselves worried for the school's "italianity", its teachers are carrying out their work worthy of the best italian pedogogical tradition, using diversity as a resort to supply to the massive cuts and decadence of public education. Until when they will call them "foreigners"? Rome is changing, and while some use this transformation to boost war among the poor, others understood its potential to come through the cultural and political stagnation of the so-called "Italian society".